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Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment

This report by the NIEHS Worker Training Program identifies how climate change will affect the health of workers and how we should prepare for these i...

Emergency Plan

Every site should have an emergency plan that informs workers where to go in case of an emergency. A map is an easy way to communicate exit routes and...

Physiological Monitoring for Heat Stress Management

Michael's Schmoldt's PowerPoint, presented at the AIHA Conference on June 1, 2015 in Salt Lake City, outlines a physiological monitoring program to pr...

Heat Stress in Construction

This presentation was given by Dr. Michele Twilley and Gavin West, MPH at the Chesapeake Region Safety Council's Annual Conference, April 8, 2014. The...

Direct sunlight

Direct sunlight heats up the body and can lead to heat-related illnesses even if workers aren't involved in strenuous labor....

Rest in shade

OSHA emphasizes the importance of shade in reducing the risk of heat-related illnesses. Cheap canopies are available to provide shade if no natural sh...

Drinking water on a hot job

One of the best ways to avoid heat-related illnesses on a construction job is to drink plenty of water, particularly at the beginning of the summer wh...

Drinking water in the shade

OSHA recommends that, on a hot job, workers drink a liter of water over one hour, which is about one cup every fifteen minutes. The agency's program...

Wear layered clothing

To ward off cold working construction in winter, wear several layers of clothing....

Working in the cold

When working in cold weather, wear a hat that covers the ears, but fits under a hard hat....