Equipment: Getting On and Off

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CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training

Summary Statement

This toolbox talk was created by NIOSH and CPWR and covers the potential dangers of getting on and off of equipment. The design allows workers to view a graphic while the facilitator presents the information. After the talk, the sheet can be posted on the jobsite with the graphic side out to reinforce the key points.
2013

CPWR Toolbox Talk logoGetting on and off equipment can lead to accidents ranging from sprains, cuts, bruises, fractures and even death.

 

 

Here is an Example

Joe was an operator of a front-end loader. He went to climb down from the cab and lost his footing on the steps. Joe fell to the ground and sprained his ankle.

  1. How could this accident have been avoided?
  2. Have you ever experienced an accident similar to this at your worksite?

Getting On and Off Equipment

  • Face the equipment and maintain three-point contact when descending.
  • Wear shoes that will provide support and traction.
  • Set the parking brake to prevent the equipment from moving.
  • Keep areas clean and free of debris.
  • Inspect the steps for mud or other conditions that will make the footing slippery.

What Are We Going to Do Today?

What will we do here at the worksite today to prevent injuries while getting on and off equipment?

1.____________________________________________________________

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2.____________________________________________________________

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3.____________________________________________________________

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OSHA STANDARD: 1926.600, 1926.20

Graphic of one worker cleaning up debris while another worker climbs onto a tractor maintaining three-point contact.

  • Face the equipment and maintain three-point contact when descending.
  • Keep areas clean and free of debris.
  • Inspect the steps for mud or other conditions that will make the footing slippery.